Instead Introduction

    Henry De Vere Stacpoole was born at 1863. After qualifying in 1891 he made many voyages as a ship’s doctor, gathering experiences that he later used in his novels. Settling down to write, he published about a dozen novels before making his name with The Blue Lagoon (1908), a romantic story of two children shipwrecked on a Pacific island. It appealed particularly to the contemporary love of childhood fantasy, in the manner of Peter Pan and The Blue Bird, and was successful both on the stage and when made into a film.


A GAME, DAILY ILLUSTRATED CHAPTER

BOOK I, PART I

 CHAPTER I WHERE THE SLUSH LAMP BURNS
 CHAPTER II UNDER THE STARS
 CHAPTER III THE SHADOW AND THE FIRE
 CHAPTER IV AND LIKE A DREAM DISSOLVED
 CHAPTER V VOICES HEARD IN THE MIST
 CHAPTER VI DAWN ON A WIDE, WIDE SEA
 CHAPTER VII STORY OF THE PIG AND THE BILLY-GOAT
 CHAPTER VIII "S-H-E-N-A-N-D-O-A-H"
 CHAPTER IX SHADOWS IN THE MOONLIGHT
 CHAPTER X THE TRAGEDY OF THE BOATS

BOOK I, PART II

 CHAPTER XI THE ISLAND
 CHAPTER XII THE LAKE OF AZURE
 CHAPTER XIII DEATH VEILED WITH LICHEN
 CHAPTER XIV ECHOES OF FAIRY-LAND
 CHAPTER XV FAIR PICTURES IN THE BLUE

BOOK I, PART III

 CHAPTER XVI THE POETRY OF LEARNING
 CHAPTER XVII THE DEVIL'S CASK
 CHAPTER XVIII THE RAT HUNT
 CHAPTER XIX STARLIGHT ON THE FOAM
 CHAPTER XX THE DREAMER ON THE REEF
 CHAPTER XXI THE GARLAND OF FLOWERS
 CHAPTER XXII ALONE
 CHAPTER XXIII THEY MOVE AWAY

BOOK II, PART I

 CHAPTER I UNDER THE ARTU TREE
 CHAPTER II HALF CHILD--HALF SAVAGE
 CHAPTER III THE DEMON OF THE REEF
 CHAPTER IV WHAT BEAUTY CONCEALED
 CHAPTER V THE SOUND OF A DRUM
 CHAPTER VI SAILS UPON THE SEA
 CHAPTER VII THE SCHOONER
 CHAPTER VIII LOVE STEPS IN
 CHAPTER IX THE SLEEP OF PARADISE

BOOK II, PART II

 CHAPTER X AN ISLAND HONEYMOON
 CHAPTER XI THE VANISHING OF EMMELINE
 CHAPTER XII THE VANISHING OF EMMELINE (continued)
 CHAPTER XIII THE NEWCOMER
 CHAPTER XIV HANNAH
 CHAPTER XV THE LAGOON OF FIRE
 CHAPTER XVI THE CYCLONE
 CHAPTER XVII THE STRICKEN WOODS
 CHAPTER XVIII A FALLEN IDOL
 CHAPTER XIX THE EXPEDITION
 CHAPTER XX THE KEEPER OF THE LAGOON
 CHAPTER XXI THE HAND OF THE SEA
 CHAPTER XXII TOGETHER

BOOK III, PART I

 CHAPTER I MAD LESTRANGE
 CHAPTER II THE SECRET OF THE AZURE
 CHAPTER III CAPTAIN FOUNTAIN
 CHAPTER IV DUE SOUTH

    ... The man at the table, Arthur Lestrange, was seated with his large, deep-sunken eyes fixed on a book. He was most evidently in consumption--very near, indeed, to reaping the result of that last and most desperate remedy, a long sea voyage.

    Emmeline Lestrange, his little niece--eight years of age, a mysterious mite, small for her age, with thoughts of her own, wide pupilled eyes that seemed the doors for visions, and a face that seemed just to have peeped into this world for a moment ere it was as suddenly withdrawn sat in a corner nursing something in her arms, and rocking herself to the tune of her own thoughts.

    Dick, Lestrange's little son, eight and a bit, was somewhere under the table. They were Bostonians, bound for San Francisco, or rather for the sun and splendour of Los Angeles, where Lestrange had bought a small estate, hoping there to enjoy the life whose lease would be renewed by the long sea voyage...

***

    ...She had smiled.

    When Emmeline Lestrange smiled it was absolutely as if the light of Paradise had suddenly flashed upon her face: the happiest form of childish beauty suddenly appeared before your eyes, dazzled them and was gone...

***

    Strangely enough it was Paddy Button who usually found it. He who was always doing the wrong thing in the eyes of men, generally did the right thing in the eyes of children. Children, in fact, when they could get at Mr. Button, went for him *con amore*. He was as attractive to them as a Punch and Judy show or a German band - almost...

***

    ..."I'm thinking about the children," said Lestrange, seeming not to hear the captain's words. "Should anything happen to me before we reach port, I should like you to do something for me. It's only this: dispose of my body without--without the children knowing. It has been in my mind to ask you this for some days. Captain, those children know nothing of death."

    Le Farge moved uneasily in his chair.

    "Little Emmeline's mother died when she was two. Her father--my brother--died before she was born. Dicky never knew a mother; she died giving him birth. My God, Captain, death has laid a heavy hand on my family; can you wonder that I have hid his very name from those two creatures that I love!"


WITH RARE COLLECTION PICTURES, RARE AND RESTORED